Famille Rose Porcelain Vase

Famille Rose Porcelain Vase
Famille Rose Porcelain Vase
Qianlong period of the Qing Dynasty
22.7 cm in height, 7.9 cm in mouth diameter, 9.3 cm in bottom diameter

Colored drawing, engraving and gold inlay all find their fine expression in this elaborately decorated vase with a rotating liner. Note the pierced pattern of “Eight Trigrams” on it. Decorating porcelain wares with such a motif originated from the Yuan Dynasty, and became popular in the mid and late Ming Dynasty when Taoism was elevated to a state orthodoxy. However, it was quite an unusual case in the Qing Dynasty.

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Blue and White Porcelain Vase with Floral Pattern

Blue and White Porcelain Vase with Floral Pattern
Yongzheng period (1723-1735) of the Qing Dynasty
48 cm in height, 12 cm in mouth diameter, 14 cm in bottom diameter

Blue and white porcelain made during the reign of Emperor Yongzheng (Aisin Gioro Yinzhen by name, called reverently Shizong after death, 1678-1735) has been noted for an exquisite and refined style, comparing well with Yongle and Chenghua pieces of the Ming Dynasty. The inscription of “Yongzheng” is on the bottom of this vase decorated with a floral pattern.

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A Pair of Enamelled Porcelain Bowls

A Pair of Enamelled Porcelain Bowls
A Pair of Enamelled Porcelain Bowls
Kangxi period of the Qing Dynasty
14.6 cm in mouth diameter (each)

Developed on the basis of the metal-bodied cloisonne pieces that were originally made in the Ming Dynasty, enamelled porcelain became very popular in the reign of Emperor Kangxi who had imported various enamel materials from Europe. Kangxi, an enlightened ruler who paid attention to foreign cultures and technologies, was a forerunner of combining Chinese porcelain with Western art.

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Taoist priests Lidded Jar

Taoist priests Lidded Jar
Taoist priests Lidded Jar
Chongzhen period (1628-1644) of the Ming Dynasty
27.5 cm in height, 12.8 cm in mouth diameter, 12.1 cm in bottom diameter

By the end of the Ming Dynasty, a tendency of talking in the abstract became popular among men of letters. In freehand brushwork, figures of Taoist priests are painted on the Lid and on the outer wall of this vessel featuring much thinner glaze – a characteristic distinguishing it from previous blue and white pieces of the dynasty.

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Garlic Head-shaped Vase

Garlic Head-shaped Vase
Garlic Head-shaped Vase
Wanli period (1573-1620) of the Ming Dynasty
44 cm in height

The secondarily-fired five-color glazed porcelain originated in the period of Xuande, and prevailed in the period of Wanli (reign title of Emperor Shenzong). Iron oxide red is the main pigment applied to items of this kind, which were very popular overseas especially in Japan. This garlic head-shaped vase is a royal piece made by Jingdezhen.

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Mandarin Ducks Porcelain Plate

Mandarin Ducks Porcelain Plate
Mandarin Ducks Porcelain Plate
Jiajing period of the Ming Dynasty
22.3 cm in mouth diameter

The decorative pattern of mandarin ducks sporting in water, painted with the five colors of red, yellow, blue, green and brown on this piece, had been very popular from the Yuan to the Qing Dynasty. The inscription of “Jiajing” – reign title of Emperor Shizong (Zhu Houcong by name, 1507-1567) – on the bottom of the plate proves that it’s a royal piece made by Jingdezhen.

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